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20130124
20130201
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ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
respect the prerogatives of the united states senate and the members of congress, you represent the american people, you're the other branch of government, you have the right to know what took place. and i have an obligation commensurate with the, you know, regulations and classifications and privacy and other things at play here, to help you get the answers and we'll do that. i hope we can do it in a noncontentious, appropriate way. >> thank you. could i just mention, i think you would aee with me that every day that goes by in syria, it gets worse. so there is, it seems to me, a very strong impetus that we realize that the present policy is not succeeding and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months and 60,000 dead. >> but i think you would agree with me that whatever judgments you make, they have to pass the test of whether or not, you do them, they're actually going to make things better. >> absolutely. >> you have to make a test of the cost analysis in doing that. and i mean all kinds of cos. human life costs, treasure, effect on other countrie
they are on the books. the attorney general of the united states, eric holder, during the richmond program, he called it a cookie cutter approach to solving crime. he did not have a lot of enthusiasm about it. i remember 7 -- senator sessions held a hearing. the department of justice said that a drug dealer with a gun is a guppy and we cannot concentrate on guppies. those studies are what are ruining neighborhoods, destroying lives, and killing people. we've got to confront their behavior and take them off the street. they do not obey by all the laws that we have now. we've got to get real with what works and does not. my problem with background checks is that you are never going to get criminals to go through universal background checks. and of the law-abiding people, you will create an enormous federal theocracy -- bureaucracy, unfunded, and people have to pay the fees, pay the taxes. we do not even prosecute anybody right now that goes through the system we have. we will make all of those law- abiding people go through the system and then we will not prosecute any of the bad guys if they do catch
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3